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Old February 12th, 2016, 06:50 PM
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goodkiller goodkiller is offline
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Default Baking to completely break skates down?

Okay, I've searched for the answer (or at least some good opinions) on this for months and have come up empty.

I typically bake my new skates 2-3 times and then break them in by skating. I skate 5-7 times a week. (I go through a pair of skates every year/year 1/2). But the first 5-6 times on the new skates are horrible due to the stiffness and my horrid Fred Flintstone feet. Once I break them in, of course, they're great.

My question.. Would I be able to break down the skate completely by baking them say 10-15 times? I don't care about premature death of the skate. I already go through a pair every 12-16 months anyway and if they made something that fit me like a pair of skates that were 6-months broken in already, but said "this skate only lasts you a week" I'd buy a new pair of skates every single week.

Unfortunately, that doesn't exist so I'm trying to figure out some new trick that would let me break down the materials and stiffness so it felt like a well-worn already pliable instead of having to suffer through uncomfortable skating for weeks.

Any thoughts/Ideas?

Thanks!
gk
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Old March 10th, 2016, 10:24 AM
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Sorry for the late reply! That would partially depend on the skates and how they react to the heat molding. Some skates (mostly lower end) don't mold as well as other higher end skates.

That said, yes, baking your skates that frequently will break down your skates. Will that make your skates fit better in the short run? Probably, but it's not guaranteed. Again, it depends on the skates you purchase. When all is said and done, some of the break in will almost always have to be done on the ice. When you skate, you're flexing your boot in ways and moving your foot in different ways than you would otherwise stand on them which will help with the break in process. And no, it's not advisable nor necessarily beneficial to skate on the new skates right after baking.

On a separate note, it's recommend to wait around 24 hours after baking to skate, which will increase the longevity of the skate.

The key is to find the skates that best fit your foot and fit your preferences, so the break in time is minimized. We're working on a comprehensive skate fit chart that measures a lot of different aspects of skate fitting to match people with the best skate line we can.
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Old July 24th, 2016, 04:09 PM
beekaybee555 beekaybee555 is offline
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I wouldn't bake them more than 3 times....the glues and other epoxies will soften and lose their bonding....heat them , wear them and break them in by using them....remember when skates took 3-4 months to break in and it hurt like heck....we have become spoiled by such comfortable skates BUT, yesterdays skates lasted 3-4 YEARS and today's skates break down in 12-18 months....very expensive for comfort and lightness
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